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Join Clean Energy and Jobs Earth Day Rally!

CLEAN ENERGY AND JOBS DAY OF ACTION

FEATURING WILL STEGER AND EXCLUSIVE YOUTH SUMMIT WITH GOVERNOR DAYTON

April 22, 2014, 4 pm

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Youth and Veteran Environmental Leaders in Co-Mentorship

The Will Steger Foundation is proud to launch our 2013-14 Intergenerational Mentorship Program in partnership with the REAMP Network. This innovative mentorship model values both participants as learners and teachers, and supports 21 pairs of young and veteran environmental leaders across the Midwest. 

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2014 Climate and Energy Literacy Webinar Series

View our archived climate and energy literacy webinar series to catch up on what you missed!

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Join one (or) three Climate Rides in 2014! Support the Will Steger Foundation at the same time!

In September 2012, as a participant of Climate Ride, I biked 300 miles along California’s coast with past board member, David Bryan. It was extremely inspiring to be surrounded by so many other people passionate about climate change solutions and to hear from other leaders in the field. 

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Youth Voices of Change: Climate Change Video Contest

The Will Steger Foundation and Minnesota Pollution Control Agency are sponsoring Youth Voices of Change to raise awareness about climate change and the amazing youth engaged in solutions throughout Minnesota. Climate change is the environmental issue of our time and we believe youth have the power to make real change.

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2014 Summer Institute for Climate Change & Energy Education

August 4-6, 2014Audubon Center of the North Woods, Sandstone, MN 

Don't miss the May 15 early bird registration deadline for the 2014 Summer Institute for Climate Change & Energy Education! Reserve your seat now.

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Education Emerging Leaders Policy

Most Recent Posts

  • Spotlight on an Emerging Leader: Bryn Shank, YEA! MN Co-Chair
    Spotlight on an Emerging Leader: Bryn Shank, YEA! MN Co-Chair

    Bryn has been a driving force in YEA! MN since he joined the program two years ago as a sophomore at Central High School in St Paul. His campus earth club, Roots & Shoots, had a long legacy of success, including institutionalizing school-wide recycling and composting. But when the seniors graduated, Bryn found himself pretty much alone to carry the torch. Still, he refused to give up, and has worked tirelessly over the last two years to rebuild the Roots & Shoots team and work to make Central a leader in sustainability.

    Written on Tuesday, 15 April 2014 21:56 in Local (Minnesota) Read 225 times Read more...
  • Spotlight on an Emerging Leader: Shira Breen, YEA! MN Co-Chair

    When Shira Breen joined YEA! MN as a sophomore at Minneapolis South High School, we knew we had met someone special. She was already highly engaged in her school and home community, working with her peers to launch a food shelf at South High, and starting a community garden in the neighborhood surrounding her school campus. Following a high profile racial incident on her high school campus, she joined Students Together As Allies for Racial Trust where she received the Underground Railway Award for Strong Commitment to Equity. Shira joined the Minnesotans United for All Families campaign last year, working to defeat the amendment banning gay marriage, became a Phone Banking Coach, trained volunteers, and held courageous conversations with people from every corner of the state. In 2013, Shira became President of the South High School Green Tigers, the environmental club on campus, and was elected to be a Co-Chair for YEA! MN.

    Written on Tuesday, 15 April 2014 21:50 in Local (Minnesota) Read 196 times Read more...
  • Energy Conservation Challenge leads to Student Empowerment in Burnsville-Eagan-Savage Public Schools
    Energy Conservation Challenge leads to Student Empowerment in Burnsville-Eagan-Savage Public Schools

    The “191 Battle of the Buildings” (modeled after the EPA’s national contest) was a challenge for Burnsville-Eagan-Savage School District 191 to reduce their Carbon Footprint.  Energy reductions (calculated from buildings that saved) resulted in nearly 9% in energy reductions for the district. 

    The MN GreenCorps program is a statewide AmeriCorps program, administered through the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA).  Member Jothsna Harris will be serving in District 191 for a total of 11 months, with a focus on energy conservation.  More information about the MN GreenCorps, please visit The MPCA website at http://www.pca.state.mn.us/.

    Written on Tuesday, 15 April 2014 21:34 in Local (Minnesota) Read 330 times Read more...
  • Celebrate Earth Day!
    Written by eNewsletter
    Celebrate Earth Day!

    It’s April and that means it’s time to celebrate Earth Day all month long! We have several wonderful opportunities for you to get involved.

    Written on Friday, 11 April 2014 16:51 in eNewsletter Read 374 times Read more...
  • Why Minnesota needs a new renewable energy standard!
    Why Minnesota needs a new renewable energy standard!

    2012 was the hottest year on record within the United States. Many western states are in official states of drought. Climate change is now. Obama said this about climate change in his State of the Union address “The shift to a cleaner energy economy won’t happen overnight, and it will require tough choices along the way.  But the debate is settled.  Climate change is a fact.  And when our children’s children look us in the eye and ask if we did all we could to leave them a safer, more stable world, with new sources of energy, I want us to be able to say yes, we did.”

    Written on Wednesday, 09 April 2014 11:14 in Local (Minnesota) Read 563 times Read more...
Will Steger Foundation - Home
Thursday, 29 April 2010 11:30

Integrating the "Behavioral Wedge"

Our newest Citizen Climate curriculum emphasizes civic engagement and helps teachers and students understand the critical and complex climate solutions being discussed on the national and international stage. In the curriculum we recommend playing the Stabilization Wedge Game, a game produced by Princeton University's Carbon Mitigation Initiative . The goal of the game is to demonstrate that climate change is a problem which can be solved by implementing today's technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. The game creators, Stephen Pacala and Robert H. Socolow, show that the difference between maintaining our increasing levels of CO2 and leveling out our emissions of CO2 in the next 50 years is approximately 200 billion tons of CO2, and if illustrated graphically is a triangle (see below from Carbon Mitigation Initiative, Princeton University ).

Wedges_Figure1_8 Wedges_Figure2_8
Click the above images for a larger view

The object of the game is to keep the next fifty years of CO2 emissions flat, using eight 25 billion ton wedges from a variety of different strategies which fit into the stabilization triangle. Students have the opportunity to select from a variety of different strategies categorized as efficiency and conservation, nuclear energy, fossil-fuel based strategies, and renewables and bio storage to fill their triangle with wedges. The game is a good exercise for thinking about all the factors that go into the decision making process, such as money, political will, public opinion etc. I have enjoyed using it with students, but have found it difficult sometime to engage them because the solutions are generally disconnected from daily life.

This week the Garrison Institutes's Climate, Mind and Behavior Project , in cooperation with the Natural Resources Defense Council , came out with what they are calling informally the "Behavioral Wedge." They show how the United States alone could reduce its CO2 emissions by 1 billion tons through easy and inexpensive actions. Actions include, carpooling twice a week or telecommuting once a week; washing clothes in cold water; and unplugging or shutting off electronics more often. The actions outlined in the report, are more relevant to the average student and citizen than those in the Stabilization Wedge Game, and could possibly be integrated into the game when playing with students as a follow up, or as an introduction to solutions they can implement themselves. Let us know how you used it in your classroom, and if we adapt it for our own use we will be sure to post it!

Fore more on the Stabilization Wedge Game

Fore more on the "Behavioral Wedge"

Published in Climate Lessons
Wednesday, 21 April 2010 11:01

The Low Carbon Lifestyle-Earth Day Tips

The Low-Carbon Lifestyle
bike-walk-sign-by-payton-ch
Reducing the total carbon load on the atmosphere begins with choices individual consumers can make every day. Find out how much carbon you are personally responsible for by using a carbon footprint calculator. Then, trim off as you can in your daily life through energy-efficient lifestyle choices. Finally, go completely carbon-neutral by purchasing offsets for your remaining emissions from reputable organizations.

Step 1: Calculate your carbon footprint

As with any diet, all the little things add up – a re-charger here, an incandescent bulb there, no one’s going to notice, right? Well, you might be surprised at how much carbon you personally emit. Try using one of these carbon calculators to get the big picture on your carbon footprint: The Safe Climate Calculator , The Home Energy Saver , and The Home Energy Checkup .

Step 2: Practice energy efficiency
We all know about walking, biking, and public transit, or swapping out your conventional light bulbs for compact fluorescents. But did you know that you can save energy by insulating your water heater? Or that buying locally grown food means using less fossil fuels? Here are some tips from Audubon Magazine on how to start your “low-carbon diet.”

Step 3: Offset your remaining emissions
Emissions offsetting involves using or enhancing natural processes that trap carbon dioxide and “sink” it (take it out of the atmosphere by transforming it into solid carbon). Carbon sinks include forests, fens, and oceanic plankton. Planting trees and reforestation are some of the best long-term means of offsetting carbon emissions. You can purchase emissions offsets from companies and nonprofit organizations that plant the number of trees needed to offset a specific amount of emissions – say, the amount generated by your family’s round-trip vacation flight. There are many such companies that you can find over the internet. But, buyer beware – some of these companies are scams or involve questionable practices (such as bulldozing existing forests, ironically enough, to plant enough trees to fill the promised quota). Conduct some research about the companies you are interested in purchasing emissions offsets from in order to find out more about their business history.

Here are some companies that the Will Steger Foundation has researched and found to be reputable: Carbonfund.org , Terrapass, and Native Energy.
Published in Climate Lessons

I came across this great video today on TED:  Ideas Worth Spreading.  It is only 4 minutes, 14 seconds long, but it gives a great peak into the scientific research that can go into the making of a headline.

Rachel Pike: The science behind a climate headline

In 4 minutes, atmospheric chemist Rachel Pike provides a glimpse of the massive scientific effort behind the bold headlines on climate change, with her team -- one of thousands who contributed -- taking a risky flight over the rainforest in pursuit of data on a key molecule.

 

Published in Climate Lessons
Wednesday, 07 April 2010 09:00

Do some fact checking with your students

This week the Colbert Report on Comedy Central featured a "Science catfight" between Joe Bastardi , a meteorologist for Accuweather and Brenda Ekwurzel , a climate scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists.  The report is entertaining to watch, but also has some clearly stated claims that would be easy and interesting to investigate.  Watch the clip with your students and ask them to write down some of the claims they hear from both Joe and Brenda.  Ask them to do some internet research to see what sort of support there may be.  Share in class and let us know what you find by clicking on the leave a comment button below!

 

The Colbert Report Mon - Thurs 11:30pm / 10:30c
Science Catfight - Joe Bastardi vs. Brenda Ekwurzel
www.colbertnation.com
Colbert Report Full Episodes Political Humor Health Care Reform
Published in Climate Lessons

I came across the Climate Wizard a few weeks ago and have been playing around with it since then.  It isn't too complicated and gives students (and teachers!) an opportunity to explore a number of different aspects of climate change science including historical temperature and precipitation averages, and future climate predictions based on a number of different model scenarios.   The Wizard is a good way to introduce models, how they work, and why different models show different prediction results.  It also is a good example of ways to illustrate numerical data visually.  One thing I thought was interesting was the button in the upper right hand corner that allowed you to get the values that were used in creating the model.  This seemed like a great teachable moment.

Tools like this that allow students to customize their experiences working with data and essentially give them a chance to "play" a bit, are great starting points for discussions aroud climate change science, how to represent data and the complicated world of modeling and predictions.MNScenario

Published in Climate Lessons
Page 4 of 6

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